Obstetric History and Risk for Mild and Severe Preeclampsia

Jasovic Siveska, Emilija and Jasovic, V. (2015) Obstetric History and Risk for Mild and Severe Preeclampsia. EC Gynaecology, 1 (2). pp. 73-80.

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Abstract

Objective: The influence of antepartal, intrapartal and early neonatal risk factors, are very important during the pregnancy and the pregnancy outcome, also for the early neonatal period and the forthcoming children development. Our aim is to detect the risks groups of pregnant women that later develop Preeclampsia (PE) and risk factors that precede its appearance. Preeclampsia continues to be a massive cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. It’s a common, incompletely understood syndrome yet; unique for humans only and it is one of the most common complication of pregnancy worldwide. Over 4 million women will develop the disorder worldwide every year, 50.000-100.000 women die from the preeclampsia each year and it’s responsible for approximately 300.000 perinatal deaths [1-3]. Preeclampsia continues to be a massive cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. It’s a common, incompletely understood syndrome yet; unique for humans only and it is one of the most common complication of pregnancy worldwide. Over 4 million Materials and Methods: We examined 300 normotensive pregnant and 100 preeclamptic pregnant, divided in 2 groups: 67 pregnant with mild PE and 33 with severe PE. In research are included only single pregnancies and the following parameters: maternal age, parity and previous pregnancy history. Results: The study is based on 400 pregnancies with a mean age of 27.65 ± 5.04 years. The significant difference in the frequency of categories and age groups was tested with a method of multivariate analysis for proportion. The difference was not statistically significant p > 0.05, which clearly shows that the groups are a priori similar and comparable. Our study shows that PE is most commonly developed in primiparas (p < 0.05). The difference was at the level p < 0.001. Among women with no history of PE, the median inter birth interval was 4.24 years between the previous and actual pregnancy. Among women with mild PE the median inter birth interval was 5.96 and in group with severe PE was 8.08 years. Multiparous women who are pregnant 5, especially 10 years or more after their previous pregnancy are as likely to have preeclampsia as nulliparous women. Abbreviations: CV: cardiovascular; HELLP haemolysis: elevated liver enzymes- low platelets; MP: Mild Preeclampsia; SP: Severe Preeclampsia; PE: preeclampsia Conclusions: PE is most frequently appearing in young primiparas and adult multiparas. Pregnant women with PE got previously newborns with intrauterine growth restriction or were infertile.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Scientific Fields (Frascati) > Medical and Helath Sciences > Other medical sciences
Divisions: Higher Medical School
Depositing User: Vms Eprints
Date Deposited: 23 May 2020 22:39
Last Modified: 23 May 2020 22:39
URI: http://eprints.uklo.edu.mk/id/eprint/5252

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